An American doctor experiences the NHS. Again.

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An American doctor experiences the NHS. Again.

Postby Tim-the-Hermit » Mon Aug 29, 2016 1:49 am

A lot of the things I read by American rightists about the NHS are wrong. I think this article is good and accurate.

https://drjengunter.wordpress.com/2016/ ... nhs-again/
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Re: An American doctor experiences the NHS. Again.

Postby spongebob » Mon Aug 29, 2016 9:37 am

The trope that British citizens, as well as Canadians, hate their nationalized healthcare systems is extremely popular in the US and I have seen absolutely no evidence of it when I speak to any citizens of those countries. I'm not familiar with what he UK government might be doing to change it, though my guess would be cutting funds. It's already significantly less expensive than our system in the US. And don't let any of those righties tell you waiting is only a side effect of a nationalized system. Just go to any ER in the US and see how long you have to wait. Try getting an appointment at any specialist next week--good luck with that! Even most general practitioners are either booked out a week or two or they are refusing to see new patients. We have a well documented, significant shortage of general practitioners in rural areas. My sister was a nurse at a private practice for years and rarely was able to leave the office before 7 PM due to the backlog. Here in the US, we have all the adverse side-effects that haters of NHS claim are indigenous only to socialized medicine, AND we pay a whole lot more for the pleasure. How's that for stupid?
Man is a credulous animal, and must believe something; in the absence of good grounds for belief, he will be satisfied with bad ones.
~Bertrand Russell

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Re: An American doctor experiences the NHS. Again.

Postby Tim-the-Hermit » Mon Aug 29, 2016 10:53 am

spongebob wrote:The trope that British citizens, as well as Canadians, hate their nationalized healthcare systems is extremely popular in the US and I have seen absolutely no evidence of it when I speak to any citizens of those countries. I'm not familiar with what he UK government might be doing to change it, though my guess would be cutting funds. It's already significantly less expensive than our system in the US. And don't let any of those righties tell you waiting is only a side effect of a nationalized system. Just go to any ER in the US and see how long you have to wait. Try getting an appointment at any specialist next week--good luck with that! Even most general practitioners are either booked out a week or two or they are refusing to see new patients. We have a well documented, significant shortage of general practitioners in rural areas. My sister was a nurse at a private practice for years and rarely was able to leave the office before 7 PM due to the backlog. Here in the US, we have all the adverse side-effects that haters of NHS claim are indigenous only to socialized medicine, AND we pay a whole lot more for the pleasure. How's that for stupid?


Absolutely. Unfortunately, the Tories are now trying to copy the American model, not only cutting funds but privatising health services too. They're copying a model that is good only for those who want to make a lot of money.

I'm a type 1 diabetic and I regularly attend the diabetic clinic, eye clinic and podiatry for excellent co-ordinated care that prevents blindness, amputation and death. That's on top of my GP and emergency services. All free, no messing around with forms and getting an OK from all sorts of parties. Please do not believe the propaganda put forward by the rightists.
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Re: An American doctor experiences the NHS. Again.

Postby spongebob » Mon Aug 29, 2016 12:09 pm

Tim-the-Hermit wrote:Absolutely. Unfortunately, the Tories are now trying to copy the American model, not only cutting funds but privatising health services too. They're copying a model that is good only for those who want to make a lot of money.


That's perhaps worse news even than Brexit. Aren't they aware that almost all Americans hate our current system of health insurance? Even the most conservative consumer hates it; we all hate it. Most don't want a nationalized system either, but they still hate our current system.

Don't get this confused with actual health care, as in doctors and hospitals. That is a much different question and depends a lot on where you live and how much money you have. As with most things American, the more money you have, the better off you are. And of course if you have plenty of money, health insurance is irrelevant; you don't need it. So private ownership of healthcare practices is fine; it's the private health insurance system that is abhorrent.

I'm a type 1 diabetic and I regularly attend the diabetic clinic, eye clinic and podiatry for excellent co-ordinated care that prevents blindness, amputation and death. That's on top of my GP and emergency services. All free, no messing around with forms and getting an OK from all sorts of parties. Please do not believe the propaganda put forward by the rightists.


Well, let's be realistic, ok? Nothing is "free", right? You pay for your healthcare through taxation. But this taxation is done on a per capita basis, so you pay according to your wealth. If you are poor you pay very little to nothing. If you are wealthy you pay a lot more but of course you can afford it. This is a mild socialistic program, ok? But it holds great benefit for society as a whole. Healthy people can work and be productive, right? And what stops many people from being healthy? Not having access to good quality health care. American style health insurance works similarly by taking in premiums from everyone, which creates a large stash of cash. When you need treatment, you get to claim some of that stash to pay for your treatment, but with some caveats of course. This works OK except that the costs of health treatments continue to rise much faster than the money taken in by insurers. The same could happen in Britain if your health care costs began to spiral out of control as ours have. Your only recourse would be to increase taxes, which I'm sure people are loath to do.

I don't know if you've heard about the recent price gouging by the company that makes the epinephrine injectors (epi pens, they are called) needed by people with very aggressive allergies. My daughter has a powerful allergy to peanuts and so she has to have one with her at all times. Recently, Mylan, the manufacturer has jacked the price by $500! And these pens are only viable for about a year, so they have to be replaced annually. Note that many of the people who need these in case of emergency are children. So, this is kind of what we have in the US, companies that gouge profit from ordinary people through health conditions they cannot control.
Man is a credulous animal, and must believe something; in the absence of good grounds for belief, he will be satisfied with bad ones.
~Bertrand Russell

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